Classics@

Classics@18: Zenzaro

Towards better VREs: key concepts and basic challenges Simone Zenzaro Improving the current state of Virtual Research Environments (VREs) requires to address the growing complexity of their design and development. To this extent, the focused awareness on three fundamental aspects of VRE design mitigates the difficulties of such a challenge. Read more

Classics@18: Galli and Nieddu

In Codice Ratio: Using VREs in the Study of the Medieval Vatican Registers Francesca Galli and Elena Nieddu 1. In Codice Ratio In Codice Ratio is a research project that aims to develop novel methods of supporting content analysis and knowledge discovery from large collections of historical documents. The goal… Read more

Classics@17: Horne

Addressing Divergent Digital Literacies and Visualizing Data Uncertainty in Social Networks and the Ancient Greek Garrisons Project Ryan Horne Introduction The interplay between representations of wealth, power, and identity has had a profound impact on historical and contemporary culture. Current political and social movements, including the Black Lives Matter movement,… Read more

Classics@14: Vidan

Magicians and Captive Maidens: Oral Sources and the Croatian Renaissance Drama Aida Vidan Croatian Renaissance literature has long been considered a cultural pinnacle as relevant in the context of its own time as it was in the subsequent centuries. Comprising a range of diverse authors and original works, it reflected… Read more

Classics@17: Introduction

Introduction Paul Dilley, with David Bouvier, Claire Clivaz, and David Hamidovic This volume of Classics@ aims to explore and analyze how the present digital turn enables a renewed theoretical engagement with multimodal ancient literacies. Cultural transmission in Antiquity was primarily oral, supplemented by images and texts. Nevertheless, Classicists first employed the… Read more

Classics@17: Bacalexi and Skarsouli

Digital Literacies and the Study of Antiquity: Case Studies on Databases Dina Bacalexi and Pinelopi Skarsouli [1] What we propose to examine in this article, taking advantage of our field experience as classicists involved in databases projects about the Ancient Greek and Roman World, is… Read more

Classics@17: Burns, Hollis, and Johnson

The Future of Ancient Literacy: Classical Language Toolkit and Google Summer of Code Patrick J. Burns, Luke Hollis, and Kyle P. Johnson Introduction The Classical Language Toolkit (CLTK) is software that brings natural language processing (NLP) to the languages of ancient, classical, and medieval Eurasia. This paper chronicles CLTK’s participation… Read more

Classics@17: Digital Literacies

Classics@17: Digital Literacies Edited by Paul Dilley [From the Introduction] This volume of Classics@ aims to explore and analyze how the present digital turn enables a renewed theoretical engagement with multimodal ancient literacies. Cultural transmission in Antiquity was primarily oral, supplemented by images and texts. Nevertheless, Classicists first employed the term… Read more

Classics@17: Reggiani

Ancient doctors’ literacies and the digital edition of papyri of medical content* Nicola Reggiani In her seminal article about “Doctors’ literacy and papyri of medical content” (2010), Ann E. Hanson showed how the multifarious evidence provided by the Greek papyri from Egypt bears witness to… Read more

Classics@17: Tully

Exploring the “Flute Girls” of Ancient Greece through Multimodality Christine Tulley Introduction The figure of the ancient “flute girl,” once thought to be merely an entertainer-prostitute, is problematic and complex. Flute girls [1] or more accurately, aulêtrides (female aulos players), are often considered mere prostitutes… Read more