News

On Student-Scholars, Editor-Scribes, and the Homer Multitext: An Interview with Mary Ebbott

"... the editor is no longer a dictator of what the text is, but rather someone who provides access to the sources within a framework that allows users to make these comparisons, to ask new questions, and to re-use the material for his or her own purposes."--Mary Ebbott We recently had the opportunity to interview Mary Ebbott, Associate Professor of Classics at Holy Cross and co-Editor of the Homer Multitext (HMT)… Read more

In Memoriam: Juha Sihvola (1957-2012)

With a sad heart we share news of the passing of Juha Sihvola, a dear colleague and former Junior Fellow at CHS (1994-1995). Professor Sihvola, who was the Director of the Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies and a Professor of History at the University of Jyväskylä, died on June 14th… Read more

Francophone Scholarship@CHS

We are pleased to share the following publications and resources which highlight or feature the contributions of influential Francophone scholars and scholarship. Image: Andromache mourns Hector (1783), by Jacques-Louis David, Musée du Louvre, Paris. Available via Wikimedia Commons. Read more

In Dialogue: Rethinking Xenophon and Education with Norman Sandridge

We are pleased to share the following in-depth and thoughtful discussion with Norman B. Sandridge, an assistant professor of Classics at Howard University. His forthcoming book, Loving Humanity, Learning, and Being Honored: The Foundations of Leadership in Xenophon’s Education of Cyrus will be published in the fall of 2012. He is also one of the editors of “Cyrus’ Paradise,” a collaborative online commentary to the Cyropaedia (www.cyropaedia.org). This busy scholar took the… Read more

Focused on System Thinking

We are pleased to feature the following publications and resources that use controlled and innovative perspectives to explore the ancient Greek mytho-poetic tradition as a rich, interconnected system. Taken together, these complimentary works offer a rich and proven critical framework for studying the various layers of meaning in Greek poetry. "Moonrise," oil on canvas, by American artist Frederic Edwin Church, 1889. Santa Barbara Museum of Art, Santa Barbara, California. Frederic… Read more

Q&A with Scott Fitzgerald Johnson

We are pleased to share the following interview with Scott Fitzgerald Johnson. Johnson is the author or coauthor of several works on late antiquity and the cult of saints including the newly released Miracle Tales from Byzantium. This volume, which is part of the recently launched Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library series, includes Johnson’s English translation of the fifth-century Miracles of Saint Thekla (alongside two Byzantine miracle collections translated by Dr.… Read more

Rethinking Classical Education

We are pleased to highlight the following publications and resources which offer fresh perspectives on the theme of classical education in all its multiforms. To access these resources and more, visit CHS online at chs.harvard.edu. Image: detail from The School of Athens, Apostolic Palace, Vatican City, by Raphael [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.  Online Publications Leonard Muellner, Classics@ Vol. 3, "Discovery Procedures and Principles for Homeric Research" Working from Benveniste's… Read more

Gregory Nagy’s Short Writings, Vol. 1 & 2

New in Online Publications Gregory Nagy is a renowned authority in the field of Homeric and related Greek studies and has written almost one hundred articles and reviews. In Short Writings, Volumes 1 and 2, we have collected together in digital form almost thirty of his most influential works. Many of these articles have been expanded or updated since their original publication. See below for contents and details. The links… Read more

Q&A with Anna Bonifazi

We recently had a chance to talk with Anna Bonifazi about her research, Homeric diction, and her new book, Homer's Verisicolored Fabric: The Evocative Power of Ancient Greek Epic Wordmaking. CHS: Your book examines two main subjects: 1) the pronominalization of Odysseus as ἐκεῖνος and as αὐτός 2) the treatment of particles and adverbs deriving from αὐ- and from αὐτός with a focus on the notion of discourse markers. Why was… Read more